Diet and nutrition

A heart-healthy diet:

What’s good for your heart is great for your taste buds

As the recipes in this special collection will show, you don’t have to lose flavor to gain health. Cooking up heart health requires no secret ingredients. It simply means making dishes that are lower in saturated fat, cholesterol, and total fat, and reduced in sodium. And, as an extra plus, these dishes have fewer calories than those higher in fat:

Anti-Oxidants and Free Radicals

 

 

Antioxidants are highly promoted by media, some physicians and dietitians, and nutritional industries for a variety of reasons. They are said to help slow the aging process and prevent vision loss, cancer, heart disease, stroke, and other chronic diseases.

Once it was thought that antioxidants were harmless, but researchers are learning that it might be possible to get too much of a good thing. Very little is known about how much a person should get or the long-term consequences of gigantic doses of antioxidants.

Free Radicals

Best Diets Overall

U.S. News & World Report ranks the DASH diet as #1

Heart Healthy Eating

Dietary Guidelines of a Heart Healthy Diet include the following:

  • Fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and
  • Fat-free or low-fat milk products;
  • Lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, eggs, and nuts; and is low in saturated fats, trans fats, cholesterol, salt (sodium), and added sugars.


An Average Weekly Menu should include the following ingredients:
 

Which foods help keep your heart in good shape?

Foods such as nuts, grains, fruits, vegetables and oils contain beneficial compounds that include plant sterols, soluble fiber and monounsaturated fats. When these foods are used in a low saturated fat, low cholesterol diet, they can lower your cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart disease. However, no diet will do the trick if portions are too big, you don't stop smoking or without adequate physical exercise and weight control.

Green Tea and Coffee

 

Drink one or more cups of green tea or coffee per day and you may have a lower risk of Coronary Artery Disease and Stroke, according to a study published online March 14.

The superfoods you need now

I found this terrific article on "eating healthy".

Take a look (From: Sally Kuzemchak, R.D., Health.com):

When it comes to getting healthy -- and staying that way -- there's no better place to start than your plate. All of the foods here are great for you at any age, but eat the right ones at the right times, and you'll have a natural defense against any problems facing your body through the years.

Your 20s

Boost bones with calcium. This decade marks your last shot at building bone mass. (Later on, eating well and exercising will help you maintain what you've got.) Yet according to government research, more than half of women in their 20s get less than the 1,000mg of calcium they need daily to do that.

Diets

A ‘heart healthy' diet:

What’s good for your heart is great for your taste buds.
As the recipes in this special collection will show, you don’t have to lose flavor to gain health. Cooking up heart health requires no secret ingredients. It simply means making dishes that are lower in saturated fat,
cholesterol, and total fat, and reduced in sodium. And, as an extra plus, these dishes have fewer calories than those higher in fat.

The Mediterranean Diet:

The Mediterranean diet has proven beneficial effects not only regarding metabolic syndrome, but also on its individual components including waist circumference, HDL-cholesterol levels, triglycerides levels, blood pressure levels and glucose metabolism, according to a new study.

The DASH Diet for Hypertension

The DASH Diet is based on the research studies: Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, and has been proven to lower blood pressure, reduce cholesterol, and improve insulin sensitivity. The DASH diet provides more than just the traditional low salt or low sodium diet plans to help lower blood pressure. It is based on an eating plan proven to lower blood pressure, a plan rich in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat or nonfat dairy. 

Diet after Coronary Artery Bypass surgery

To help you with your recovery after Bypass surgery you will need  healthy balance of carbohydrate-rich foods high in fiber, such as unrefined whole grain breads, crackers and cereals and a variety of other whole grains like brown or wild rice, wheat berries or bulgur. These foods, along with a variety of fruits, vegetables, legumes, low-fat dairy products and lean meats, eaten in moderate portions, will help one both lose weight and as well as cholesterol reduction.