Cholesterol Drugs

Various medications can lower your blood cholesterol levels. They may be prescribed in combination with other drugs. They work in the body in different ways. Some affect the liver, some work in the intestines and some interrupt the formation of cholesterol from circulating in the blood.

They include:


Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs may help reduce the bad cholesterol (LDL), increase the good cholesterol (HDL) and reduce triglycerides (a blood fat).

Cholestyramine (Questran)

If you suffer from the sometimes very disabling side effects of statins, there may be an alternative that should be discussed with your doctor: Cholestyramine (Questran) is an oral medication that reduces the levels of cholesterol in the blood and improves the itching associated with liver disease.


Fibrates are best at lowering triglycerides and in some cases increasing HDL (good cholesterol) levels. These drugs are not very effective in lowering LDL (bad) cholesterol.

Niacin (Nicotinic Acid)

This drug works in the liver by affecting the production of blood fats. Niacin is prescribed to lower triglycerides and LDL cholesterol and raise HDL ("good") cholesterol.